WBUR’s Radio Boston

How organizations are centering equity in fighting climate change

Simón Rios and Amanda Beland
April 24, 2024
One layer of sidewalk is all the water left behind on a section of Chestnut Street in Leominster, where flood waters from torrential rain swept away the road in 2023. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
One layer of sidewalk is all the water left behind on a section of Chestnut Street in Leominster, where flood waters from torrential rain swept away the road in 2023. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR) (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

The National Weather Service is forecasting most of the country will face record high temps this summer, with the Northeast also predicted to have more rainfall than normal. This comes as communities around the region are facing 60% more extreme rain, the largest increase for any region in the country according to the most recent National Climate Assessment.

We check in what all of this and more means for those living in Boston and New England with David Cash, administrator of the EPA’s New England region, and Dwaign Tyndal, executive director of Alternatives for Community and Environment, a non-profit that works on environmental justice in Roxbury.

This segment aired on April 24, 2024.

Hear original story on wbur.org